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Tuesday, 5 February 2013

On Tour

        Part 1 

          Sore legs at the John Treacy 10 in Dungarvan last week prompted an easy week with four days of no training sandwiched between a Monday evening swim and a Saturday morning bike ride. These old legs needed the break. An experimental two hard weeks leading up to the Saturday before Dungarvan left me with damaged limbs that easy time will always heal. I'v ridden bike race's with sore legs as part of an extended training block, but the hour+ of relentless pounding are no comparison to no impact pedalling. Well recovered at this stage, a five miler this evening should be enough to get me back in the right mindset.

           A 64 min. 10 is pretty close to my best, a big positive out of this one is that its the first one I'v ran 'under control', that's to say I did'nt go through the first mile in the top 30!, ran my slowest first five and fastest last mile of any previous 10, with sore legs. So, happy enough on the way home.
         
          Happy enough, For any runner the thoughts of going faster are always to the fore, on the drive home they become overpowering. You can take the positives but the negatives will always remind you of whats involved in the task of trying to go faster. As soon as the shoes are laced up for the next run we'll all just get on with it, Dungarvan will be old news, even at this stage, it's old news! your only as good as your last race.

         Old news it may be, but it has now become one of the 'must do' races on the Irish scene. Very well organised in an athletics stronghold that has a habit of pumping out great runners. On the previous night over in Boston David McCarthy wore the West Waterford AC singlet to a 3.57 mile behind Olympic silver medalist Galen Rupp. These people know how to run a race (no pun intended, they know how to run a race and they also know how to run a race). Wide roads, great facilities, sunshine and a storm force gale finished the jigsaw.

        This early in the year the calendar is bursting. Like a child in a sweet shop it's hard to decide which one's to pick. Four, five, ten miles, hill running, bike races. I'll take them as they come. My tried and trusted formula at this stage. Long term planning does'nt work in this house!

      Part 2 

Ballyhoura's rolling hills are a magnet for many 

        I got out on the bike last Saturday morning, windy but damn bright. A low lying winter sun made it a day for the shade's, the spray of water from the wheel in front and the dazzling sun kept the grimace on my face for the return trip from Kilfinane. My first trip into the Ballyhoura region on a bike for quite a while. A brief excursion on a hot summers evening for a hill race last June was my last reason to head out there. If you hav'nt been, it's a spectacular area, more so on a morning like this. Characterised by a continuos barrage of rolling hills, The rise through olde worlde Ballyorgan on the road to it's big brother Kilfinane being the most testing.

        On a morning like this it's hard to resist the bike bug, so I'm laying the blame firmly on the good company, weather and terrain for passing it on again. As far as I know there is no cure for it, but it is a cure for a multitude. Endorphins overiding the sore neck and shoulders overiding the occupational hazard of heavy legs. A similar but different feeling than you get after a similar length (timewise) run. The novelty of going a lot faster for the same effort (If I could run 3.57 miles average I'd be well up there!) was a welcome break from what's become the norm for the time crunched thirty something.  

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2 comments:

  1. 64min nice running for 10 miles, you will go under the hour with no problems in a few months.

    I am trying to get a bit more motivated so thinking about mallow 10 (might see you there), if I sign up the embarassment of running poorly might get me off my sofa and help shift some of the 90kg+ i am carrying around.

    You should give cross country a go, the cold, the muck, the pain, it's fantastic, you do suffer more than a road race, but I prefer it to the road

    Thats the great thing about BHAA, I don't have to plan anything, I usually decide the night before the race if I will run and take it from there.

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  2. Thanks Anthony (not sure which Anthony I'm replying to),
    I'm keen to give the cross country a go alright but at this stage I'll wait till September, as far as I know the cross country is winding down at this stage.
    Looking forward to Mallow now, think I'm coming round a small bit, enter it, nothing like a race entry to get you going.
    In the meantime I think there's a 5k in Doneraile park on March 5th, might be worth a look.
    See you at one (or both)of 'em.

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